A step-by-step guide to improving patient experience for PX champions

Are you interested to hear from patient experience champions on best practice strategies to improve the levels of patient satisfaction?

Improving Patient Experience and Choice held in Sydney on 10 – 11 October 2016, is a premier two-day forum bringing together key stakeholders from Government, Health Districts, Hospitals and Health Care Providers.

My company Energesse is happy to be the Knowledge Partner at this event. In line with this, will be chairing Day 1 of the conference and will also be leading the workshop:

The 6 E Framework

A step-by-step guide to improving patient experience for PX champions

This workshop presents the 6 E Framework, a step by step guide on how to holistically improve patient experience, adaptable for any healthcare setting. This workshop will provide you with tools and techniques that you can use immediately.

improve px

With the UK’s NHS Head of Experience of Care, David McNally, and other C-Suite Executives, Directors and Leaders in Patient Experience speaking at this event. This two-day forum is a timely event for you to develop strategies and share expertise on improving patient experience and choice in Australia.

Here’s a sneak peek at other program highlights

International keynote:

  • David McNally, Head of Experience of Care, NHS England

Patient-centered culture and care

  • Carrie Marr, Chief Executive, Clinical Excellence Commission
  • Robin Whyte, Chief Executive Officer, Eastern Melbourne PHN
  • Rene Pennock, Chief Executive Officer, South Western Sydney PHN

The final early-bird ends this month, 30th September 2016 (Friday).   You may also avail of group discounts, call 02 9368 3915.

Hope you will join me, David McNally, Jean-Frederic and other leading patient experience professionals from Australia in October – for an unrivalled networking opportunity and unprecedented access to Australia’s leading patient experience champions.

If you wish to have a chat before the workshop, I’d be happy to get on a call. Drop me a note at avnesh@energesse.com or call 02 8091 0918.

 

Election Policies Need to Put Patients First

The Australian Federal Elections are drawing near. The Conservatives and the Labour Party are once again pitching their wares – fighting it out on who has the best health policy. Amongst the spouted sales spiel and all its nation-centric statistical data, the patient’s (what the policies are/should be ultimately all about) voice is lost.

A recently released book on ‘Patient-Provider Communication’ (Blackstone, Beukelman and Yorkston, April 2015), noted ‘that patients, health care providers, policy makers, and researchers live in nearly parallel universes with differing incentives, access to data and information, accountability expectations, and time frames for action’. What this alludes to is the potential for differing visions in patient healthcare, experiences and communications – resulting in a potentially disparate state of affairs.

What if patient experiences were given a larger focus in the formation of national health policies? How much more refined would policies be? Undoubtedly, communication between patients and their clinicians/hospital management will have more prominence in local and national policies. And from high-level policy to on-the-ground realities, issues like how to better communicate with the patient over things like a treatment or healthcare plan would get the attention it so rightfully deserves.

In my recent trip to the Beryl Institute Conference in Dallas, I had the good fortune of meeting with Dr. Tom Scaletta and Julie Danker – who lead patient experience initiatives at the Edward-Elmhurst Hospital – and found out how they manage patient communications. Regarded as one of the leaders in this space with their G.R.E.A.T. coaching techniques, they imparted practical insight into communication and engagement techniques that can help patients and clinicians.

Here are some key takeaways from them:

  • Contact patients the day after ED discharge – it keeps them safe and satisfied
  • Engage patients digitally – it reduces cost and increases reach
  • Automate work processes – it allows charge nurses and case managers to efficiently intervene at the right points in the workflow process
  • Build in an automated response mechanism/module into your systems – it allows for the acknowledgement of compliments and resolution of complaints by ED leaders
  • Measure, measure, measure – use statistically-valid metrics and patient comments to drive provider performance. We can always keep improving.

If you want to know more, watch the video below from our Patient Experience Channel (or check out www.eehealth.org/great)

How will the Patient Experience evolve in Australia?

Australia is embarking on a major journey to put patients at the center of decision-making in the healthcare system. In order for us to understand how the patient experience landscape in Australia will change over the coming decade, we can observe the trends in the US as an example.

The pioneering hospitals in the US that invested in measuring and improving the Patient Experience did so because they believed was the ‘right thing to do’. This first phase was driven by the investment of ‘early adopters’. Their leadership had a belief that patients should be involved in various committees in the hospital’s administration to influence service delivery. 

The next big phase that brought greater change to the system was the public reporting of quality measures by the Centers of Medicare and Medicaid Services, the primary funder in the US. This reporting of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey on hospital websites drove senior leaders to take a greater focus on metrics that were important to patients. 

Note that there is a difference between active reporting and passive reporting. As more active reporting occurs on various websites, and those findings communicated broadly, the greater the pressure on hospitals to be accountable to their results. 

Transparency breeds trust, and greater public reporting should bring greater trust and engagement with the patient community.

The subsequent phase took approximately four years from the initiation of public reporting in the US for funding to be specifically tied to Patient-Reported Outcome Measures and Patient Reported Experience Measures (Satisfaction Scores). These value-based payments will increase from 1% in 2015 of the hospital’s funding to higher percentages over the coming years.  It demonstrates a great commitment from the US health system to align its payment incentives to what patients really need and want from their healthcare.

I would expect similar trends to play out in Australia. Though, I expect we may be quicker in our adoption of patient-centred measures to drive change.

On another note, while in Dallas for the Beryl Institute Patient Experience Conference 2016, I connected with Jeff Kauffman a CEO from the aged-care (assisted living) sector  in the US, who had a couple of secrets on aligning staff incentives with the resident experience in such facilities. 

Enjoy this episode and let me know your feedback!

 

The day “patient-centred care” became a reality in Australia

Energesse, one of Australia’s leading healthcare IT consultancies, will be unveiling the first  patient feedback technology to measure patient emotions.  The MES Experience platform has transformed the NHS, and Energesse is bringing the technology to the exhibition after trialling it with one of Australia’s largest hospital districts for the past 18 months.

Dr Avnesh Ratnanesan from Energesse, together with the director of MES from London, Nick Goodman, will be showcasing the technology on stage in the Healthcare Innovation Zone at 3.40pm on 15th March.

The MES Experience technology is a multichannel platform for collecting patient experience and satisfaction data at point-of-care, and reports meaningful analytics for managers. This technology has the potential to truly enable patient-centred care in Australia by producing quantitative data on the emotional aspects of patient opinion in real-time. For the first time, health services will be able to monitor and adjust patient care according to the current situation.

If you are attending the conference, please do come and witness the debut of MES Experience software platform on stage in the Exhibition Centre. Free passes to the Expo can be obtained here, if you have not registered on any events yet.  Thanks and we look forward to seeing you on the 15th!

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