The Process Manager, Efficiency Manager or the PX Champion – Which Type Are You?

A lady walks into a hospital. She winces, rubbing her arm then kneading it gently. She approaches reception. She sighs and scribbles what she needs to on a form and is then motioned into the waiting room. She scurries up when she hears her name and disappears into a consultation room. Two days later, she walks out to a waiting car outside the hospital. She’s not rubbing her arm anymore.

If you ask a hospital manager what they think about the above scenario, and their focus is process rather than patient experience, they would probably measure success as a patient’s condition resolved, her details recorded on the right forms and the availability of a hospital bed (length of stay) as a result of that problem resolution.

Turn now to the healthcare center whose focus is patient management and efficiency; they would ensure that the effectiveness of every step of the healthcare process – from the patient arriving at reception to patient discharge – is measured and efficient from a time and activity perspective.

Now question the healthcare center whose focus is the patient journey. They would do all of the above, and more. They’ll wager their time to understand and measure the ‘winces’, the ‘sighs’, the ‘scurry’, the manner in which the patient ‘walks out to the waiting car outside of the hospital.’ They ensure the right questions are asked of the right people at the right time. They would also very likely follow-up with her after discharge to ensure her safety and service satisfaction. For these healthcare centers – the Patient Experience (PX) champions – the patient is at the very center of the care they receive.

The focus would be:

  1. Did the patient require help filling out the form (was there a physical pain or language barrier) VS. did the patient fill in the form we need them to fill in?
  2. Did the patient understand what the doctor was saying VS. did the doctor explain everything to the patient?
  3. Did the patient experience compassion and empathy during treatment VS. were staff able to treat the patient in a professional and timely manner?
  4. Were the family members reassured about the patient’s situation VS. were the family members informed about the patient’s situation?
  5. Is the patient able to perform well at work and at home in the days and weeks after discharge VS. was the patient followed-up with the day after discharge?

Taking a holistic view, the PX champions would also ask staff, if they were making a difference, if they felt resourced, supported, celebrated and if they felt like they had meaning in their work i.e. ‘living their purpose’ ?

Understanding the various elements that comprise the patient’s journey and then measuring each element of that journey, is what separates the wheat from the chaff, the top performing healthcare centers from the average ones.

Many are now riding the wave of PX trends. A 2013 survey of management committees in more than 1000 hospitals conducted by Catalyst Healthcare Research and the Beryl Institute, found that 70% of respondents ranked ‘patient experience and satisfaction’ as one of their top three priorities over the next few years – it exceeded cost management, capital improvements, HR and healthcare processes. The survey also found that more and more healthcare centers were delegating this very important area to dedicated experience leaders.

What kind of healthcare leader would be more meaningful to you?

Election Policies Need to Put Patients First

The Australian Federal Elections are drawing near. The Conservatives and the Labour Party are once again pitching their wares – fighting it out on who has the best health policy. Amongst the spouted sales spiel and all its nation-centric statistical data, the patient’s (what the policies are/should be ultimately all about) voice is lost.

A recently released book on ‘Patient-Provider Communication’ (Blackstone, Beukelman and Yorkston, April 2015), noted ‘that patients, health care providers, policy makers, and researchers live in nearly parallel universes with differing incentives, access to data and information, accountability expectations, and time frames for action’. What this alludes to is the potential for differing visions in patient healthcare, experiences and communications – resulting in a potentially disparate state of affairs.

What if patient experiences were given a larger focus in the formation of national health policies? How much more refined would policies be? Undoubtedly, communication between patients and their clinicians/hospital management will have more prominence in local and national policies. And from high-level policy to on-the-ground realities, issues like how to better communicate with the patient over things like a treatment or healthcare plan would get the attention it so rightfully deserves.

In my recent trip to the Beryl Institute Conference in Dallas, I had the good fortune of meeting with Dr. Tom Scaletta and Julie Danker – who lead patient experience initiatives at the Edward-Elmhurst Hospital – and found out how they manage patient communications. Regarded as one of the leaders in this space with their G.R.E.A.T. coaching techniques, they imparted practical insight into communication and engagement techniques that can help patients and clinicians.

Here are some key takeaways from them:

  • Contact patients the day after ED discharge – it keeps them safe and satisfied
  • Engage patients digitally – it reduces cost and increases reach
  • Automate work processes – it allows charge nurses and case managers to efficiently intervene at the right points in the workflow process
  • Build in an automated response mechanism/module into your systems – it allows for the acknowledgement of compliments and resolution of complaints by ED leaders
  • Measure, measure, measure – use statistically-valid metrics and patient comments to drive provider performance. We can always keep improving.

If you want to know more, watch the video below from our Patient Experience Channel (or check out www.eehealth.org/great)

Are we Ready for One Standard Measure of Patient Experience across Australian health?

Most recently, I had the pleasure of being invited to speak at the Improving Healthcare International Convention 2015 on the topic of Patient Experience case studies from the NHS, UK.

There is a growing body of evidence on patient experience measurement and linking financial incentives to them are starting to influence the thinking around patient experience measurement and improvement in Australia.

The last week I was having coffee with Michael Greco, the CEO of Patient Opinion in Australia. Patient Opinion is a website developed in the UK where patients can place elaborate comments, stories and experiences on a platform, such that it increases the transparency of how services are delivered in hospitals. The technology platform from the UK that Energesse introduced is called MES Experience, a multichannel platform for collecting patient feedback (patient experience/satisfaction) data at point-of-care and reporting meaningful analytics for managers.

As we are both heavily involved in mechanisms for improving patient experience through better data, it dawned on us that one of the major challenges in making a difference in Australia (compared to the UK) was that, we still do not have a single, clear national standardised metric for measuring improvement of patient experience.

Within the NHS there has been implementation of a standard measure of patient experience called the ‘Friends and Family Test’. Whilst there has been much debate about the measure over the last 5 years of its implementation, the one thing it has done is has raised the bar on the conversations and investments on how healthcare services should be measured and delivered in a truly patient-centred way, with input from patients.

Australian public hospitals are required to improve quality metrics around patient experience set around Standard 2, one of the 9 quality standards set by the Australian Commission for Safety and Quality in Healthcare. This standard calls for effective partnerships between consumers, healthcare providers and healthcare organisations which are deemed essential for safe and high quality care in national health policy in Australia.1-3

This standard aims to guide health services to become responsive to patient, carer and consumer needs and actually partners with consumers in the implementation of all other NSQHS Standards. However, according to the Commission reports, some health services have found the implementation of systems to meet the requirements of Standard 2 challenging4.

Private sector hospitals on the other hand are utilising their own divergent set of Patient Reported Experience Measures (PREMs), largely based upon surveys from the US healthcare system (HCAHPS) as well as the incorporating from other major payors such as health insurance funds. I’ve had conversations with several CEO’s and Directors of Clinical Governance who have really taken the lead in this space with patient experience measurement, and have evolved their own systems for managing it.

However, it remains clear that in general, Australian health services and hospitals are still at their infancy in terms of executing the latest strategies to collect, analyse, measure and improve patient experience. The lack of a standard national metric and the complexity of survey questions and aggregated data sources can further confuse management decision-making and budget allocation in this space.

Guidance from organisations such as the Picker Institute and Beryl Institute are helpful, yet implementation of these questions do require tailoring to local needs, such as in translation of survey questions to local ethnic languages. There also needs to be electronic mechanisms in place to complement paper-based collection in order to improve response rates, engagement and obtain meaningful insights in real-time.

Most importantly is the need to close the feedback loop and take action from patient experience data. Whilst some ward staff and executives may see this process as a ‘tick-box’ exercise, patient experience data collection is actually a driver for organisational strategy and a source for targeting innovation initiatives with real financial outcomes.

Why?

Because from my years as strategist in the corporate health sector (including for very successful pharmaceutical company with over $1bil in annual revenue), I learned one major fact – organisation that is close to its ‘customer’, is the most financially viable over the long term. Hospitals that are sensitive to understanding the needs and wants of its patients, will be the best performing over the long term.

Analysing patient complaints and frustrations may seem like a dreary task, however these ‘warning signs’ are particularly useful when coming directly from patients or front-line staff. Alleviation of patient concerns in an early stage acts as an ‘early warning system’ that can reduce systemic errors and multi-million dollar lawsuits. There are also often many positive stories that can be effectively shared in the organisation to lift morale and staff engagement.

One of the most neglected aspects of patient feedback is the long form narrative where the rich depth of patient insights often lie. In the business world, market research companies understand that these ‘long form narratives’ provide a rich source of insights on how an organisation should innovate its services. However, one of the reasons many surveys tend not to encourage these narratives is that they are difficult to analyse manually in high volumes.

Fortunately, many technologies now exist that can perform automated free text analysis to extract deeper actionable insights from this type of data and to keep service managers updated. Among them are tools like PanSensic, InVivo and SAS, some of which are customised for analysing patient experience data. Some of these tools are also able to analyse compassion, staff attitude and quality of communication.

From helping implementations of patient experience initiatives, here are 8 tips I’ve observed that can help Clinical Governance and Patient Experience managers:

  1. Have a systematic annual strategy and implementation plan that you’ve shared with a cross section of stakeholders in the hospital.
  2. Design your data collection, analysis and dissemination process so the right person gets the right data at the right time.
  3. How you design the questions for local use and ask the questions is critical – some patients/consumers will love doing a survey electronically at point of care, others may want to do it from home post-discharge – give them options.
  4. Analyse data effectively to translate them into actionable insights. Many ‘big data’ technologies that can save managers time, and perform these tasks more objectively and effectively than humans.
  5. Implement changes through a prioritisation process involving a multi-displinary team (that involves ideally 2 consumer representatives).
  6. Visibly demonstrate the results of feedback and management actions to drive culture change, motivation and results over the long term. Front line clinical staff want to know that their daily hard work is appreciated. It also helps them improve the quality of their care and communication if they understand that these aspects can actually be measured via patient feedback.
  7. Finally, monitor experience with a ward’s performance metrics to ensure that interventions are effective are continuously aligned with patient needs – many wards now have visibly transparent performance dashboards on the ward. The right way to do this is to have 3-4 main high priority metrics visible (not 20 metrics that cannot be easily seen by busy staff)
  8. Have the discipline to iterate the process to achieve continuous improvements to outcomes. Repetition is key to behaviour change. For any person, in any industry.

What are your thoughts on developing one standard metric for patient experience in Australia?

Do check out the Patient Experience Australia LinkedIn Community if you’d like to engage other leaders on this topic.

References

  1. Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights. Commonwealth of Australia, 2008. (Accessed 28 August 2014, at http://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/national-priorities/charter-of-healthcare-rights)
  2. Australian Safety and Quality Framework for Health Care. Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Health Care, 2010. (Accessed 28 August 2014, at http://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/national-priorities/australian-safety-and-quality-framework-for-health-care/)
  3. Australian Safety and Quality Goals for Health Care Partnering with Consumers: Action Guide. ACSQHC, 2012. (Accessed 28 August 2014, at http://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/publications/goal-3-partnering-with-consumers-action-guide/)
  4. Safety and Quality Improvement Guide Standard 2. Partnering with Consumers. Embedding partnerships in Healthcare. Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Healthcare. (Accessed 4 December 2015, http://www.safetyandquality.gov.au/publications/safety-and-quality-improvement-guide-standard-2-partnering-with-consumers-october-2012

The Importance of Patient Experience – More than Comments on Hospital Food?

3308600_c71c6e180e_mThe last 2 weeks was a great opportunity to share much the latest research that we had conducted over the last 2 years on Patient and Customer Experience in Healthcare.

The healthcare sector is certainly coming alive this month as I recently completed one of my busiest schedules having delivered 4 consecutive speeches at the Health Insurance Summit, the Health Informatics Society of Australia conference, an Executive Breakfast on Sustainable Patient-Centred Healthcare and the CPA Australia Health and Aged Care Sector conference.

In my travels, I was amazed to learn that many healthcare executives are still trying to get their heads around understanding the importance of patient experience.

Intuitively, everyone believes it is the right thing to do.

Yet, often in Australia there is a sense that if you ask a patient about their hospital experience, then the answers that are likely to come back are comments about the food.

Nothing could be further from the truth.

In 2009, the Mid-Staffordshire crisis in the NHS showed that one of the major reasons for multiple service failures and safety issues was the lack of transparency and disconnect between senior management and front-line staff and patients. Feedback from patients on safety and quality issues were largely ignored.

It began a whole ‘patient revolution’ in the NHS that mandated the need to collect and analyse feedback from patients, and turn the insights into meaningful actions for improvement.

Whilst this may seem like ‘additional work’ for already busy ward staff, according to Sir Robert Naylor, CEO of University College London Hospitals, measuring patient experience provides an early indicator of safety and quality, helping to prevent them from occurring.

The philosophy of being sensitive to front line experience, feedback and comments in order to improve organisational performance may be relatively new to healthcare, but it is well known in the business world.

At one of the conferences, it was mentioned that a former CEO of ANZ bank had a direct line to the Head of the Complaints Department, and wanted a daily update of what customers were complaining about, so he could clearly understand the customers voice through all the ‘noise’ from management layers in his organisation. Steve Jobs, founder of Apple, was also known for reading and responding to customer feedback e-mails himself, so he could get his team to make improvements in Apple products fast, before any major reputational damage.

Indeed, there is a clear trend that smart leaders with decision-making ability need to obtain front-line feedback fast, so improvements can be made quickly. Digital platforms such as the MES Experience platform, which we’ve brought in from the UK and are currently pilot in Sydney Local Health District, is allowing deeper insights from patient experience feedback to be collected, and sent to senior management in real-time.

I’d love to know how you are measuring and analysing patient experience in your hospital and how that’s working for you. Simply leave a reply below.

Empowering Health Journeys by improving Patient Experience (PX)

Improving the Patient Experience or ‘PX’ is becoming an increasingly important objective and metric in our hospitals. While this concept has taken a while to catch on in Australia (compared to countries like the UK), it is encouraging that it is part of many hospitals’ accreditation process these days. Some health CEO’s have stated that a closer eye on PX acts as an ‘early warning system’ to pick up underlying quality and safety issues that may be occurring.

As a parallel story, my 3 years developing start-ups in the technology industry enlightened me to the tech industry’s an absolute obsession with User Experience (UX). A successful technology platform has to be so customer focussed and understand a user’s behaviour in such detail, that it could predict the next 10-20 moves of customer journey and make it as pleasant and effortless as possible, so they don’t have to choose any other option.

Google staff used to say “Remember, our competitor is just one click away”, referring to the ease in which someone could make a choice to switch service if they were dissatisfied. I believe this attitude, combined with data analytics capability, will make Google and Apple major health players in the future, once they understand how traditional health systems work.

How would a strong discipline of improving PX help the health and wellbeing of all Australians?

Like in any system, consumers that are more empowered are more likely to push improvements in the system. In the case of healthcare, particularly in the public sector, users (i.e. patients) may not always have a choice as to which doctor, nurse or specialist they see. This occasional lack of choice therefore disempowers individuals who are then not incentivised to drive innovation in the system.

If that psychology around ‘walking in a patient’s shoes’, empowering them with choices and improving PX can be harnessed, today’s predictive analytics and technology could easily modify behaviours that result in reduced obesity, diabetes and other chronic conditions, simply by making it as effortless and pleasant as possible to do so. These technologies, like the Fitbit for individuals and MES Experience, a digital patient survey platform for hospitals, can analyse feedback data quickly so changes can be made rapidly.

If you’d like to learn more on ways to empower consumers and improve experience in the health journey, you may have received the invitation last week for the breakfast event called Building a Sustainable, Patient-Centred Healthcare System on Aug 11, 2015, 7.30 AM to 10.30 PM (AEST) | Sydney.  Please join us if you are available, or feel free to pass on this invitation to your colleagues in healthcare. Click here to REGISTER

Future Solutions in Customer Experience and Retention for Private Health Insurance

The ‘Future Solutions in Customer Experience for Health Insurers White Paper’ is a research paper developed to help Australian health insurers deliver greater customer experience and customer retention. This White Paper is aimed for CEO’s, General Managers, marketers, sales and customer service leaders as well as analysts, policymakers and researchers in the industry. It is a ‘how to’ guide for getting closer to the consumer from a more complete, holistic perspective in order to drive strategic and tactical decisions.

Insights in this Paper were compiled from analysis of in-depth interviews and presentations from representatives of 10 Australian Private Health Insurance companies. Australia now has a relatively mature Private Health Insurance industry with over 11 million members and over $21bn in annual revenue in 2015. However, industry growth occurs in an evolving Australian market, which is increasingly complex. Consumers have to choose between over 17,000 different policies currently available for sale and over 25,000 policies currently in the market.

 Download the White Paper

Lapse rates can rise to over 20% of customers with some insurers (13). This equates to lost revenue (or switching of sales) exceeding $2bn per annum from lapses of an estimated 940,000 members up to 2014. These considerably high lapse rates have a significant financial impact on insurers due to the relatively tight net profit margins of most funds. In addition, insurers and customers waste a significant amount of time negotiating and resolving issues related to poor purchasing and claims experiences.

Applying a Systems Thinking approach to this complex, problem, we find a Vicious Cycle occurring in the industry in relation to customer retention and experience. From the consolidated analysis of contributor interviews, the real reason for poor customer experiences can be summarised into these 4 major themes. These include customer perceptions of confusion and lack of value, regulatory and competitive forces, sub-optimal systems, processes and data management as well as health system dynamics.

Following the analysis of interviews with industry experts, themes of solutions were consolidated. The solution model must also be robust, resilient to unpredictability and enable an organization to learn over time. In short, its execution must be a ‘Virtuous Cycle’ of CX Solutions, which is as follows:

  1. Define & Refine CX with Vision, Strategy and Objectives
  2. Align Leadership and Culture with Change Management
  3. Implement Systems and Capabilities to support CX
  4. Translate Perceptions into CX Insights & Priorities
  5. Apply CX strategically across portfolio, product design and marketing channels
  6. Extend CX across healthcare ecosystem

For some organisations, the implementation of all these solutions may take months to years and significant financial investment. As such, for those organizations that are time poor and can only do ONE THING to begin moving in the right direction, it would be to start understanding their customer perceptions much better than they are doing now. Every step of the Virtuous Cycle is largely defined by having deep psycho-emotional insights into customer perceptions. It all begins with the customer in mind, or rather ‘the customers mind’.

10 Insights for Sustainable Healthcare in Australia from Sir Robert Naylor

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Sir Robert Naylor and Avi

At a recent conference hosted by the Health Services Innovation group in Tasmania, I had the privilege of engaging with a few leading CEOs and researchers in healthcare. Whilst there were many highlights, Sir Robert Naylor, the CEO of  University College London Hospitals (UCLH) was outstanding in his insights.

UCLH has been ranked the 4th highest performing NHS Trust in the UK and a large part of that is due to its clinical and executive management approaches.

A few key points that he made:

1.  Payors in the UK i.e. government funding authorities are increasingly wanting to pay for value, rather than activity. This sentiment has been echoed in Australia as we are placing more thought on how Medicare can move toward a model of payment for outcomes, rather than activities.

2.  Providers need to focus on ‘transformation’ rather than ‘translation’. Sir Robert suggested that there is a need to form integrated systems along pathways; in order to this incremental changes is no longer good enough and patient pathways have to be viewed and changed as a whole.

3.  It is imperative to engage patients as active partners in their care. “Doctors need to change from being God to Guide”. We need to change the current archetypal image so patients have more ability to take responsibility for their care.

4.  Integration would be improve outcomes and reduce costs. The word “integration” is used often, but the word means different things to different stakeholders

5.  Sustainability is the “nirvana” that we are looking to achieve. In the UK, the healthcare system has 8% reduction in funding next year due to a “Cost improvement program”, while in Australia, stakeholders are complaining about 4% growth.

6.  Consumers and the public trust doctors, hence Sir Robert feels that we have to get the clinicians to communicate with the community. People want a good relationship with their GP, and GPs that understand patient’s concerns.

7.  He also encourages more clinical leadership in executive teams and encourages them to train in business and management skills. His Medical Directors manage the money, the people and the quality or care.

8.   Sir Robert observed that Australia is 5 years behind the UK in terms of the performance data currently published, which is not sufficiently meaningful for real change. Publishing league tables is good for improving transparency and performance; at UCLH they publish mortality rates down to doctor level. The 2013 Francis Report on failings in Mid-Staffordshire NHS Trust was a largely due to a lack of transparency – this is why league tables are very useful.

9.   The top priorities at UCLH are Patient Quality which includes:

·         Patient outcomes (is it going to make me better),

·         Patient Safety (is it safe for me),

·         Patient Experience (compliments/complaints)

NHS

These top priorities are put up on whiteboards on each ward, with top metrics updated daily e.g.. staff levels, infections rates. Each of his 9000 staff need to have these translated in a way that is meaningful to them, including janitorial staff.

10.  In terms of current thinking on innovation in the UK, a 5 year forward review by Simon Stevens suggested

  • Radical upgrade in prevention and public health
  • Break down barriers between GPs and public hospitals
  • New models of integrated care (Dalton Review)
  • Re-design emergency and urgent care

Sir Robert recommends tertiary health centers should focus only in a couple of areas of expertise where possible as it improves outcomes e.g. Cancer and Neurosciences. This is to establish critical mass, and involved UCLH giving up cardiac patients to other centres, but will dramatically improve mortality rates and build capability. He admires the Dutch system where they selected only 8 hospitals to treat complex chronic disease patients. Centralising services like stroke services has reduced mortality by 50%.

Wellness Bloggers and the Gaps in the Health System

I was approached by an ECU Daily journalist a couple of weeks ago in regards to the Popularity of controversial Wellness bloggers like Belle Gibson is a side-effect of major gaps in health system.

See below some insights I shared with Danielle Austin of ECU Daily:

How should Consumers approach Wellness Information on the internet?

  • Consumers should exercise a degree of care when looking for wellness information online. Whilst this is the predominant method of research for the vast majority of people these days, it is much harder to make a distinction on ‘what’s right for them’.

Where should people seek their medical information and how can they be sure that health information they read on the internet is not fraudulent?

  • Depends on the type of health information they are looking for. If due to a medical illness, they should consult their doctor or qualified health professional
  • Do research online to see if the website is supported by such institutions or purely commercial interests.
  • A good example of a credible site would be the Betterhealthchannel.vic.gov.au, which was created by the Victorian government. However, the user-friendliness of design and content could be improved significantly, and this is where a lot of credible sites are managing poorly. Consumers then take to other more ‘attractive’ sites by celebrities and big brands.

How should consumers approach celebrity endorsed diets/ health claims (e.g. Pete Evans Paleo for babies)?

  • Celebrities are entitled to their opinion on what products and services they wish to recommend. However, consumers should do a check that the health results are verified by independent scientific bodies, which determines the validity of those claims. Every person is an individual with individual needs in terms of diet, exercise, mental, social and environmental needs. They should consult qualified health professionals if they have specific health needs. They should also listen to their bodies in terms of any concerning symptoms, and consult a health professional.

How can cancer patients, and patients of other illnesses, find wellness programs to support them without giving them false medical information?

  • Patients with severe illness should ask their doctor, hospital or qualified health professional about wellness programs that are right for them. Some hospitals such as the Chris O’Brien Lifehouse (affiliated with RPA) and Olivia Newton John Cancer Wellness centre in Melbourne (Austin Health), all are affiliated with hospitals.
  • In Perth there is the Solaris Care Centre which has provided good quality wellness care. They all have a good track record or providing care, support ongoing research and are affiliated with medical professionals in some way.

Read the full ECU Daily article here

How about you, what are your thoughts on this topic? Do share your comments and suggestions with me and the Energesse wellness community. I look forward to hearing from you.

Medicare Review by Minister Ley needs to remove ‘Vicious Cycle’ of healthcare politics

Ministers Ley’s recently announced review of Medicare has largely been welcomed, however it remains to be seen whether it will dig ‘deep enough’. A multidisciplinary review of Federal Government payment mechanism is warranted as the current ‘fee-for-service’ model incentivises ‘doing as much as possible, for as many as possible’. This can lead to inappropriate testing, procedures, financial waste and even potential harm. A new strategy is required to break the cycle of rising costs, as demonstrated in the Future Solutions in Australian Healthcare White Paper, which interviewed 21 leading health experts on how to reform the health system. ‘Out of the box’ strategies included delinking healthcare spending from political intervention, such as with the Reserve Bank and interest rates.

Read the full article from The Australian

Popularity of controversial Wellness bloggers like Belle Gibson is a side-effect of major gaps in health system

The recent revelation of wellness blogger Belle Gibson is a disappointment to her large following of cancer patients. However, it is a sign of a deeper failing in the health system such that patients are looking to online personalities for health information that they should be receiving from the health system. The health system is in need of a major overhaul to cater to the wellness needs of society. Patient engagement programs for illness like cancer may be non-existent or largely disconnected and unemotional. Health promotion efforts should have stories of real patients and be back up by credible doctors with a mixture of factual medical evidence and appealing personalities.

Click here to read article from The Australian